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Four theories to improve justice in Latin America

In the new issue of Developing Latin America: ‘Four theories to improve justice in the region’, co-written with my good friend, the lawyer Basilio A. Martínez-Villa, we provide a very brief introduction to the theories of justice of John Rawls, Ronald Dworkin, Jürgen Habermas and Amartya Sen, as they bring forward the requirement for developing indicators with a wider scope, and we summarize relevant aspects of justice that can enrich the needed reflection and discussion for new Latin American models of justice.


Abstract: The theories of justice according to Rawls, Dworkin, Habermas and Sen, although from a predominantly Anglo-Saxon background, are useful for the Latin American reality. Such views of justice bring forward the requirement for developing indicators with a wider scope, so that they measure diverse aspects such as: income, commodities, freedoms, economic, cultural, educative, political and well-being factors. Concluding remarks summarize relevant aspects of justice that can enrich the needed reflection and discussion for new Latin American models of justice.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Martinez-Villa, B. A. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2016). Four theories to improve justice in the region. Information Development, 32(4), 1284–1288. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666916658588

Announcement: Pathways into information literacy and communities of practice

Pathways Flyer Coming soon! ‘Pathways into information literacy and communities of practice’, by Chandos Publishing, with my chapter ‘Inclusion of information literacy in the curriculum through learning communities and action research’, co-authored with Javier Tarango, José Luis Evangelista and Jesús Cortés

The most “perfect” voting system in the world

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In the new issue of Developing Latin America, I present the most common criticisms to e-voting systems, focusing on the Venezuelan case, with 15 elections during the last 17 years. This is the so-called most “perfect” voting system in the world. But it has been widely questioned, studied and contested.


Abstract: Elections are indispensable for democracy, but their trustworthiness demands transparency and impartiality from governments, even more so for automated elections. This work presents common criticisms to e-voting systems, focusing on the Venezuelan case, where there have been around 15 elections of this kind in the last 17 years. The Venezuelan government calls it the most perfect voting system in the world, but its results have been questioned, studied and contested.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). The most “perfect” voting system in the world. Information Development, 32(3), 751-755. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666916647140

From Caracas to Lyon: A road toward sustainable development?

UntitledFurther expanding on topics around public libraries (and as a sister issue to a previous column), together with Renny Granda we ask if the Caracas Declaration for the Public Library (1982) and the Lyon Declaration on Access to Information and Development (2014) can allow us to follow a path toward sustainable development from our libraries.


Abstract: We offer elements and reflections to tackle from Latin American societies and public libraries for moving toward sustainable development. From the Caracas Declaration for the Public Library to the Lyon Declaration on Access to Information and Development, there has been a clear and constant plea to the development of Latin America, assuming the value information has for progress and focusing on the access to information, literacy, education and culture as human rights.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Granda, R. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). From Caracas to Lyon: A road toward sustainable development? Information Development, 32(2), 216-218. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915626830

See also the previous sister column: Granda, R. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). Regional consensus gave birth to the modern public library. Information Development, 31(3), 314-316. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915577166

Scientific production in Mexican universities: Rates and expectations toward competitiveness

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Together with Javier Tarango, we analyze issues of scientific production in Mexican universities.


Abstract: This article analyzes emerging issues that Mexican universities are experiencing with scientific production processes, their impact on assessment indicators that determine their level of competitiveness, and the identification of assessment dimensions and criteria related to the activities of professors and researchers. Examples of previous research on universities’ competitiveness are offered to provide suggestions for recognizing the need for legitimized models that allow assessing scientific production in Mexican universities.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Tarango, J. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2016). Scientific production in Mexican universities: Rates and expectations toward competitiveness. Information Development, 32(1), 107-111. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915613730

Learning with social media: An information literacy driven and technologically mediated experience

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This was my second presentation for the 3rd. European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL 2015), which took place during October 19-22 in Tallinn, Estonia. This second participation, presented on October 22 2015, was about the final stage of my PhD thesis, and it took place just a couple of days before the official defence. The full text of this presentation (as well as that of the other one) was published in Springer’s Communications in Computer and Information Science (see below).


Abstract: This paper summarizes the theories, methods, and results of a doctoral research that integrated social media (SM) in a learning experience for students and explored the roles that information literacy, digital literacy, and new literacies played in such a learning experience. Participatory action research was the methodological approach used for two rounds of data collection, resulting in the development of the research framework ‘Doing Online Relearning through Information Skills’ (DORIS). The data collection methods used included students’ reports, diagnostic, and final questionnaires; and semi-structured interviews. Data analysis relied on content analysis, open coding, and constant comparative analysis. This paper provides a summary of the discussion leading to the answers to the research questions, including topics such as issues and challenges of using SM for learning; participants learning experiences in such a technologically mediated environment, their engagement and the mutual shaping of SM, learning experiences, and literacies.

Full text at Springer Link

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J.D. (2015). Learning with social media: An information literacy driven and technologically mediated experience. Information Literacy: Moving Toward Sustainability; Communications in Computer and Information Science, 552, 328-335. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28197-1_34

Two years of Information Culture Development for supporting higher education: Initiatives, teacher’s perceptions and future actions

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This was one of my presentations for the 3rd. European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL 2015), which took place during October 19-22 in Tallinn, Estonia. This first participation, presented on October 19, 2015 was about my work as a reference librarian in CETYS Universidad. This kind of participations allows us to promote our institutional milestones regarding the development of the Distinctive Element of CETYS Education labeled Information Culture. Also, it’s an interesting case study because we are covering information culture in a holistic manner, showing the activities conducted by both the academia and the libraries to foster its development, and highlighting collaborative experiences; this represents an area of immediate interest to those within this field of research and practice. The full text of this presentation (as well as that of the other one) was published in Springer’s Communications in Computer and Information Science (see below).


Abstract: Information Culture Development (ICD) is a holistic information literacy program that was established in 2013 and developed at CETYS Universidad in Mexico. ICD caters to all university stakeholders with different initiatives that are contained within ICD’s four axes: (a) curriculum and learning support, (b) information and digital literacies development, (c) research and scientific communication support, and (d) evaluation and communication of results. This article presents such initiatives and the instruments used to evaluate them. Moreover, it analyses recent interviews with eight academic staff that have known of and benefited from these initiatives, both for themselves and for their students. The data analysis offers a means of determining ICD’s role in supporting the development of an information culture and positively influencing teaching, learning and research practices in the university. Furthermore, academic staff insights help guide the program’s further development, by pointing toward the need for future actions and strategies.

Full text at Springer Link

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J.D. (2015). Two years of information culture development for supporting higher education: Initiatives, teacher’s perceptions and future actions. Information Literacy: Moving Toward Sustainability; Communications in Computer and Information Science, 552, 517-526. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28197-1_52

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