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Los números de 2015

Los duendes de las estadísticas de WordPress.com prepararon un informe sobre el año 2015 de este blog.

Aquí hay un extracto:

Un teleférico de San Francisco puede contener 60 personas. Este blog fue visto por 770 veces en 2015. Si el blog fue un teleférico, se necesitarían alrededor de 13 viajes para llevar tantas personas.

Haz click para ver el reporte completo.

Learning with social media: An information literacy driven and technologically mediated experience

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This was my second presentation for the 3rd. European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL 2015), which took place during October 19-22 in Tallinn, Estonia. This second participation, presented on October 22 2015, was about the final stage of my PhD thesis, and it took place just a couple of days before the official defence. The full text of this presentation (as well as that of the other one) was published in Springer’s Communications in Computer and Information Science (see below).


Abstract: This paper summarizes the theories, methods, and results of a doctoral research that integrated social media (SM) in a learning experience for students and explored the roles that information literacy, digital literacy, and new literacies played in such a learning experience. Participatory action research was the methodological approach used for two rounds of data collection, resulting in the development of the research framework ‘Doing Online Relearning through Information Skills’ (DORIS). The data collection methods used included students’ reports, diagnostic, and final questionnaires; and semi-structured interviews. Data analysis relied on content analysis, open coding, and constant comparative analysis. This paper provides a summary of the discussion leading to the answers to the research questions, including topics such as issues and challenges of using SM for learning; participants learning experiences in such a technologically mediated environment, their engagement and the mutual shaping of SM, learning experiences, and literacies.

Full text at Springer Link

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J.D. (2015). Learning with social media: An information literacy driven and technologically mediated experience. Information Literacy: Moving Toward Sustainability; Communications in Computer and Information Science, 552, 328-335. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28197-1_34

Two years of Information Culture Development for supporting higher education: Initiatives, teacher’s perceptions and future actions

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This was one of my presentations for the 3rd. European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL 2015), which took place during October 19-22 in Tallinn, Estonia. This first participation, presented on October 19, 2015 was about my work as a reference librarian in CETYS Universidad. This kind of participations allows us to promote our institutional milestones regarding the development of the Distinctive Element of CETYS Education labeled Information Culture. Also, it’s an interesting case study because we are covering information culture in a holistic manner, showing the activities conducted by both the academia and the libraries to foster its development, and highlighting collaborative experiences; this represents an area of immediate interest to those within this field of research and practice. The full text of this presentation (as well as that of the other one) was published in Springer’s Communications in Computer and Information Science (see below).


Abstract: Information Culture Development (ICD) is a holistic information literacy program that was established in 2013 and developed at CETYS Universidad in Mexico. ICD caters to all university stakeholders with different initiatives that are contained within ICD’s four axes: (a) curriculum and learning support, (b) information and digital literacies development, (c) research and scientific communication support, and (d) evaluation and communication of results. This article presents such initiatives and the instruments used to evaluate them. Moreover, it analyses recent interviews with eight academic staff that have known of and benefited from these initiatives, both for themselves and for their students. The data analysis offers a means of determining ICD’s role in supporting the development of an information culture and positively influencing teaching, learning and research practices in the university. Furthermore, academic staff insights help guide the program’s further development, by pointing toward the need for future actions and strategies.

Full text at Springer Link

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J.D. (2015). Two years of information culture development for supporting higher education: Initiatives, teacher’s perceptions and future actions. Information Literacy: Moving Toward Sustainability; Communications in Computer and Information Science, 552, 517-526. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28197-1_52

Latin American science is meant to be open access: Initiatives and current challenges

Together with Dominique Babini, we summarize the rise of open access in the region and its main initiatives.


Abstract: Latin American open access (OA) initiatives were built upon the foundations laid by the regional cooperative information networks, databases and indexes that started to be developed from the 1970s. OA had an early start in the region in the 1990s, because it preceded the first worldwide OA declaration. This article summarizes the reasons behind the emergence of OA in the region, offers details and data about the most relevant initiatives and discusses some of the current challenges to keep advancing in this arena.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Babini, D. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). Latin American science is meant to be open access: Initiatives and current challenges. Information Development, 31(5), 477-481. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915601420

From the ashes

From the ashes

523 years ago, one of the major cultural crimes in the history of humanity happened: slaughter, imposition of ideologies and dogmas, apart from a systematic cultural annihilation; all this meant the alteration of the independent development and of the future of the autochthonous Latin American cultures. Current Latin American civilization emerged from this event: From the ashes…


Abstract: About 523 years ago, the territory now known as the Americas was ‘discovered’. This event detonated the conquest and colonization of this ‘new world’, processes that altered the historical development of the indigenous civilizations. This work examines one of the most disheartening consequences of this clash of civilizations: the almost total destruction of the indigenous people’s cultural heritage. This annihilation was driven by the implementation of colonial domination, which implied the establishment of a new socio-political order and systematic and forced religious conversion, which included the destruction of the pictographic codices that were seen as ‘works of the devil’.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version (Coming soon!)

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). From the ashes. Information Development, 31(4), 383-386. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915591759

Regional consensus gave birth to the modern public library

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Third issue of the column Developing Latin America: article about the Caracas Declaration (1982) for public libraries, written together with my dear colleague Renny Granda. This issue of Developing Latin America deals with the Caracas Declaration as a historical milestone, stressing its importance and its vindicationas a factor of development and social change in Latin America.


Abstract: In 1982, library experts from 30 Latin American and the Caribbean countries met in Venezuela to discuss the current state and development strategies for the region’s public libraries. The result was the first technical-normative document for public libraries in the region, commonly known as the Caracas Declaration. This issue of Developing Latin America comments on the contents of this document, its influence and importance, and suggests the exercise of invoking and reviewing its principles and objectives to once again analyze the current state and project new development strategies.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version

Recommended reference: Granda, R. and Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. (2015). Regional consensus gave birth to the modern public library. Information Development, 31(3), 314-316. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915577166

The arrival of information literacy

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Jesus Lau and I just published an article where we remember and explore how did information literacy (infolit) get in the Latin American region. You may find it in the second issue of Developing Latin America, available in the journal Information Development, published by Sage. The most important elements in this article are two tables, one of them ranks Latin American countries by their academic production regarding infolit (with data gathered from the AlfinIberoamérica wiki) and the other table highlights the eight infolit declarations that have been made in the region, their date, place and the name of the event or declaration.


Abstract: Paul Zurkowski coined the term Information Literacy in 1974, since then it has evolved into a dynamic research area within library and information science, with many milestones achieved in Europe and the United States, reflected in English-written literature. This issue of Developing Latin America traces an alternative route, exploring the arrival of information literacy to the region and its main developments.

Full text at Sage Publications

Open Access version

Recommended reference: Machin-Mastromatteo, J. D. and Lau, J. (2015). The arrival of information literacy. Information Development, 31(2), 190-193. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266666915569147

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